Posted by: Justin Wallace | August 10, 2010

ResourceRoom :: Ministering to busy college students…

Human Flourishing is an essay written by Danielle Sallade. Danielle and her husband, Chris, are staff members ofPrinceton Evangelical Fellowship at Princeton University, where they both graduated before earning Master of Divinity degrees from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Sallade’s penetrating essay targets busy college students and explains how they can flourish as God intends when their work is so demanding. (This resource was found at TheGospelCoalition.org and originally posted by Justin Taylor)

Many people are discussing what constitutes genuine human flourishing. One helpful definition comes from theologian Nicholas Wolterstorff, who ties the concept of human flourishing in the Christian tradition to shalom. A flourishing life will be a life lived in right relationship with God, with one‘s environment, with neighbors, and with self. ―A flourishing life is neither merely an  ̳experientially satisfying life,‘ as many contemporary Westerners think, nor is it simply a life  ̳well-lived,‘ as a majority of ancient Western philosophers have claimed. It is a life that both goes well and is lived well.

I have the privilege through my vocation in campus ministry of serving current university students. My colleagues and I desire for our students to mature in their Christian faith during their college years. We long for them to flourish, borrowing from Wolterstorff, in right relationship with God (through justification in Christ), with their environment (caring for their habitat and working for justice as stewards accountable to God), with their neighbors (showing mercy in the name of Christ and spreading the gospel), and with themselves (proper self- understanding rooted in adoption by God in Christ). As we work toward this goal, we increasingly face challenges from the campus-culture that work against the students‘ ability to flourish. And one challenge in particular seems to affect everyone: the problem of being too busy. Read the entire essay…

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